A Tale of Two Tweets

A recent article on Cnet News, Nielsen: Twitter’s growing really, really, really, really fast, reports that Twitter is growing at a phenomenal rate of 1,382% over the past 12 months. I have to confess that I am one of the new users adding to that calculation.  This post relates the stories of two separate tweeting experiences that help demonstrate the potential power of social networking through Twitter.

The first experience was a Altman Weil webinar for law firms on managing RFPs starts. Tim Corcoran (tcorcoran), a Senior Consultant for Altman Weil, was sending tweets of highlights from the event. He wasn’t relaying a transcript of what was being said, rather he was commenting his observations of the proceedings.

“An RFP is oppty for lawyers to demonstrate problem-solving skills. Why do many see it as fill-in-the-blanks exercise to delegate? #AWRFP”

These tweets remind me of the types of notes I might have taken had I attended the event, little nuggets of information to take back to the office. That’s a nice benefit. But more importantly from Tim’s perspective is that I now have a connection in my brain that he is knowledgeable about the subject of legal RFPs. That may be important to him someday should I ever be in the position to need such help or if I am asked if I know of someone as a referral.

It also points out what I feel is a highly overlooked aspect of Twitter and Facebook type of Social Network apps. You are socializing. A single tweet on its own will not win over a new client. But the cumulative effect over time creates an ongoing conversation of sorts that eventually develops into a relationship, and decision makers are more likely to do business with you if they have a relationship.

For example, I have met Tim a few times at LMA and LexisNexis events. And he knew of me through common contacts. But I really have never had an opportunity or need to reach out and communicate with him. My relationship with him is not close enough that I would ever send him an email just to maintain my “network.” We are not that close.

But if we follow each other through Twitter, we’ll  start to become more aware of each other and begin to develop a relationship almost as if through osmosis. And it doesn’t even have to be through tweets between us. Tim responded to a Tweet from a colleague who was visiting in Chicago and wanted to know of a good restaurant near her hotel and because I follow Tim I saw the tweet (it’s like eaves dropping in a way). Tim recommended she try Heaven on 7. That happens to be one of my favorite restaurants too!  Suddenly we have a point in common that I can save in my CRM so that if the opportunity arises I can leverage that information. (Tim, if you’re reading this, let’s grab some great Cajun food for lunch the next time you’re in Chicago!).

Over time as we build up a relationship via these incidental tweets and replies, he and I will develop a familiarity, a relationship with each other to the point where I don’t have to fabricate an excuse to reach out and touch base with him if needed.  I’m no longer that guy he met at a conference two years ago. I’m now the fellow tweeter he follows. He knows me, has a sense of my personality and opinions, and it won’t be out of the ordinary nor awkward if I contact him with a direct message (DM) or e-mail. 

And the effect isn’t limited to Tim. It has this same effect to all of the folks that see my message. Everyone following me will read my tweets. I’m building relationships with many people at the same time with a single 140 character message. Talk about efficiency in communications.

The second tweeting experience was part of Legal PR Chicago luncheon where they hosted a discussion panel on social networking. I found out about the event accidentally from a tweet of one of the tweeters I follow. I did not know anything about the event but was intrigued as I wanted to see how Twitter worked at another conference, having just experience the Altman Weil webinar. (This also points out that Twitter can be a useful channel to promote your events to folks not on your mailing lists.). What I really learned from this experience is that your tweets can be seen by people that are not following you.

I simply posted a quick reply to another twitter’s comment. It had not dawn on me that I was communicating to a much larger group other than folks that follow me. Afterwards, my office neighbor came by and said, “We saw you at the luncheon!” What I did not now is that when they decided to live tweet the event they also projected the event tweets on a large screen in the room. So everyone in the room saw my post along with my Twitter ID and profile picture! This is not the norm for events but it did suddenly make me aware that there were many folks following the tweets that did not know me and that by participating I was introducing myself to them. If they think that my contribution was particularly pithy, they can click on my Twitter ID to view my profile, and from there click the button to follow me. These events represent and opportunity to expand your network and reach new contacts.

So get involved and explore Twitter.  It’s one of those tools you really need to dive into to fully understand. It won’t be long before you figure out how to apply it  to your business development needs. And then you can rewrite your own ending to “A Tale of Two Tweets.”

“It is a far, far better tweet that I do, than I have ever done; it is a far, far better network that I build, than I have ever grown.”

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